Love it worth every dollar leaves hair smooth shines. Comes with registration for ghd for any warranty issues.
The great thing about beauty is that there is something for everyone. Even as the trend these days is skewing towards plenty of texture and heatless styling, the tried-and-true flatiron still has its place. I mean, with social media going crazy over the super-sleek look of glass hair, it's clear that straight hair ain't going anywhere. After all, some of us just want smooth strands from time to time — or, depending on who you are, most of the time. But pressing your hair between two scorching-hot plates can be a recipe for a dried, sizzled, frizzy disaster. Or at least it can be if you're using the wrong flatiron. On the flip side, using a good one can make all the world of difference. And that's where we come in. We've scoured the world of flatirons to bring you the best of the best, at a range of price points. So whether you've got the coins for an affordable Conair or can shell out the big bucks for a Harry Josh, these 20 straighteners will give you that just-back-from-the-salon look — minus the scorch.
During the First World War, women around the world started to shift to shorter hairstyles that were easier to manage. In the 1920s women started for the first time to bob, shingle and crop their hair, often covering it with small head-hugging cloche hats. In Korea, the bob was called tanbal.[28] Women began marcelling their hair, creating deep waves in it using heated scissor irons. Durable permanent waving became popular also in this period:[29] it was an expensive, uncomfortable and time-consuming process, in which the hair was put in curlers and inserted into a steam or dry heat machine. During the 1930s women began to wear their hair slightly longer, in pageboys, bobs or waves and curls.[13]
A replacement as loved the first ghd straightener I bought.
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