Fine or thinning hair can easily become damaged under too much heat, so cooler temperatures (i.e., those under 300° F) are ideal for these hair types. If you have very curly, course, or thick hair, then higher temperatures upwards of 400° F may be more suitable to your needs. With the ISA Professional Titanium Flat Iron, you can cool it down to 265° F if need be and also crank it up to a whopping 450° F for textured styled.
The mysterious product that smells earthy and looks like wet sand… is good for your hair? The answer is: YES! Think of it this way; the more natural smelling, the more natural the ingredients. Clay products DO contain clay, mostly what’s called bentonite clay, which has highly absorbent properties. Clay is best used for building volume, absorbing oil and grease and drawing out impurities that can cause HAIR LOSS! Barbers choose to style with clay over other products because of its clean feel, density and ability to sculpt super flexible hairstyles. Clay products are NOT sticky, which you will find in some waxes and pomades.
Short hair for fashionable men was a product of the Neoclassical movement. Classically inspired male hair styles included the Bedford Crop, arguably the precursor of most plain modern male styles, which was invented by the radical politician Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford as a protest against a tax on hair powder; he encouraged his frends to adopt it by betting them they would not. Another influential style (or group of styles) was named by the French "à la Titus" after Titus Junius Brutus (not in fact the Roman Emperor Titus as often assumed), with hair short and layered but somewhat piled up on the crown, often with restrained quiffs or locks hanging down; variants are familiar from the hair of both Napoleon and George IV of England. The style was supposed to have been introduced by the actor François-Joseph Talma, who upstaged his wigged co-actors when appearing in productions of works such as Voltaire's Brutus (about Lucius Junius Brutus, who orders the execution of his son Titus). In 1799, a Parisian fashion magazine reported that even bald men were adopting Titus wigs,[18] and the style was also worn by women, the Journal de Paris reporting in 1802 that "more than half of elegant women were wearing their hair or wig à la Titus."[19]
During this period, Western men began to wear their hair in ways popularized by movie stars such as Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Rudolph Valentino. Men wore their hair short, and either parted on the side or in the middle, or combed straight back, and used pomade, creams and tonics to keep their hair in place. At the beginning of the Second World War and for some time afterwards, men's haircuts grew shorter, mimicking the military crewcut.[30]
No more need for pricey keratin treatments to smooth my thick unruly mane one pass of the iron and my locks are smooth straight and shiny. Thanks ghd
Bought these as a present for a friend to replace an old pair of ghd's she is extremely pleased with them they straighten her wavy hair easily and quickly...i'm thinking of purchasing a pair for when my ghd's finally give up on me.
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