This set contains a ghd gold styler a heatproof plate guard a heat resistant mat a zip bag that contains a paddle brush and two large hair clips the zip bag press studs onto the mat and the whole lot rolls together for storage . This comes in a gorgeous gift presentation box that has a hidden magnetic fastening you may want to keep this to store it in as everything fits so nicely. Anyone who received this as a present should really appreciate it.the included instructions are brief and whilst they tell you how to turn the styler on and off and cover health and safety information they do not tell you how to get the best out of the styler or how to actually use it on your hair. The assumption seems to be you already know how to straighten your hair because you already have a ghd styler or you've used another brand before. I think this is a shame and seems a bit of an oversight as this gift set could be someone's first styler. I've had cheaper straighteners in the past which had quite a detailed page on how to get the best out of the straighteners . Yes you can find this information on the internet and on youtube but sometimes it's just nice to have it there to read when you open the box.having said that they do reach temperature quickly and straighten well you can tell why it's the brand leader. My previous straighteners you could alter the temperature but I'm quite happy with how these work at a set temperature and it's one less thing to faff around with. It has a 30 minute safety cut off for me this time could be shorter but at least it does have a cut off. I love that it comes with both a heat proof mat so many products just don't seem to and the heat proof plate guard as well.overall a gorgeous hair straightening gift set that anyone not already owning a ghd styler would love to have provided they do want to straighten their hair.
wife luvs em ghds are the best in her opinion.
I just received my ghd classic sytler yesterday and registered it on ghd's website. It wasn't a fake and did my hair for the first time this morning with it and couldn't be happier with the results my hair feels so healthy I had tried a chi first returned it. Bought a croc which was better but still wouldn't tame my thick coarse hair without being on the 450 degree setting which made me nervous. I bought the ghd on the recommendation of a couple of friends who I trust. Read reviews on amazon and made sure to purchase the iron direct from amazon. Glad I did this flat iron is awesome my hope is that it lasts longer than a year
Some people may cover their hair totally or partially for cultural or religious reasons. Notable examples of head covering include women in Islam who wear the hijab, married women in Haredi Judaism who wear the sheitel, married Himba men who cover their hair except when in mourning, Tuareg men who wear a veil, and baptized men and women in Sikhism who wear the dastar.[3][4][5][6][7]
got my ghd classic 1 inch styler straightener today and was able to register it on the ghd site with no problem. I was a little hesitant to purchase through amazon b c of a few scary reviews that people had received fakes. If this one is a fake at least I was able to register it with non problem and will get a guaranteed from ghd as a replacement. I dont for see having any problems... I purchased this ghd straightener as a replacement to the one I purchased off amazon well over 4 1 2 years ago it just died last week . I loved my last ghd straightener good luck
In the early 1870s, in a shift that historians attribute to the influence of the West,[26] Japanese men began cutting their hair into styles known as jangiri or zangiri (which roughly means "random cropping").[27] During this period, Asian women were still wearing traditional hairstyles held up with combs, pins and sticks crafted from tortoise, metal, wood and other materials,[14] but in the middle 1880s, upper-class Japanese women began pushing back their hair in the Western style (known as sokuhatsu), or adopting Westernized versions of traditional Japanese hairstyles (these were called yakaimaki, or literally, soirée chignon).[27]
BUYER BEWARE: I bought this from Amazon LLC, but the product would NOT register as authentic on ghd's site. I tried the hologram code and date code multiple times, but the site wouldn't verify the numbers. Also there was no country of manufacture listed on the unit, the box or the booklet. The styler looked great and was packaged well. Did the unit and stickers look authentic? Yes in every way. But the ghd site states: "fake ghd products are virtually impossible to spot." I called ghd, and a rep said sometimes legit numbers aren't accepted by the site (?!) - and told me that sometimes fake numbers go through. So in the end not sure what good the checker does. The rep did add that "Amazon is not an authorized dealer for ghd products." And the rep echoed what another reviewer said, "the only way to authenticate a styler not bought from us or an authorized dealer is to send it in to the warehouse." That's too much trouble for anyone. Is the one I bought legit? I just can't tell for sure. I'm not taking the risk. Returning it to Amazon.
From the time of the Roman Empire[citation needed] until the Middle Ages, most women grew their hair as long as it would naturally grow. It was normally little styled by cutting, as women's hair was tied up on the head and covered on most occasions when outside the home with a snood, kerchief or veil; for an adult woman to wear uncovered and loose hair in the street was often restricted to prostitutes. Braiding and tying the hair was common. In the 16th century, women began to wear their hair in extremely ornate styles, often decorated with pearls, precious stones, ribbons and veils. Women used a technique called "lacing" or "taping," in which cords or ribbons were used to bind the hair around their heads.[14] During this period, most of the hair was braided and hidden under wimples, veils or couvrechefs. In the later half of the 15th century and on into the 16th century a very high hairline on the forehead was considered attractive, and wealthy women frequently plucked out hair at their temples and the napes of their necks, or used depilatory cream to remove it, if it would otherwise be visible at the edges of their hair coverings.[15] Working-class women in this period wore their hair in simple styles.[14]
I read lots of different reviews about these straighteners and a lot said these aren't genuine. They are definitely ghds just professional ones which means they are lighter. They are exactly the same ones at my hair dressers. I'm happy.
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