This straightener heats up cools down very rapidly. It's light and easy to use. Doesn't singe your hair. The delivery was very quick too. Highly recommend this ghd straightener.
In summary, you will want to buy a hair brush straightener that has a lower temp range, from about 250-300° (any temps higher than that and you are likely to damage your hair – start at the lowest temp possible and work up if needed). You will also want to consider a ceramic model they will heat evenly and a bit more slowly and will not create hot spots which can damage fine hair.
For normal to medium thick hair, the ideal temperature is somewhere between 300 to 350 Fahrenheit. If the length is below the shoulder, experts recommend the heat setting 360 to 380 degrees Fahrenheit. If you can, choose a model that has a digital panel. This allows you to see exactly how much heat the hair straightener is pressing onto your hair at any given time.

However, the search for the best hair straightener for your specific hair type can be daunting. In fact, it’s always difficult when it comes to choosing the right hair tool, whatever that may be. After all, we’re talking about something that could make or break your crowning glory. Well, have no fear on this one. We’ve taken the heat off your hair to find out which of the best hair straighteners work best.


I love my ghd's and so does my mad unruly curly hair hoorah for ghd thank you from the bottom of my hair roots

We do love the fact that the flat iron remembers your last heat setting so you don’t have to keep changing it every time you turn the hair straightener on. With this flat iron, you also get an automatic shut off feature. The plates are 1.5 inches wide which makes it ideal for individuals with medium to long thick tresses. However, it isn’t ideal for making curls due to the large plates. Also, there may be durability issues as several owners have reported that their units never lasted more than a year.
ghd is the best hair styler I've ever got it's very fast in heating up .. And you'll be ready in no timeit would be great if it included a glove though

After the war, women started to wear their hair in softer, more natural styles. In the early 1950s women's hair was generally curled and worn in a variety of styles and lengths. In the later 1950s, high bouffant and beehive styles, sometimes nicknamed B-52s for their similarity to the bulbous noses of the B-52 Stratofortress bomber, became popular.[31] During this period many women washed and set their hair only once a week, and kept it in place by wearing curlers every night and reteasing and respraying it every morning.[32] In the 1960s, many women began to wear their hair in short modern cuts such as the pixie cut, while in the 1970s, hair tended to be longer and looser. In both the 1960s and 1970s many men and women wore their hair very long and straight.[2] Women straightened their hair through chemical straightening processes, by ironing their hair at home with a clothes iron, or by rolling it up with large empty cans while wet.[33] African-American men and women began wearing their hair naturally (unprocessed) in large Afros, sometimes ornamented with Afro picks made from wood or plastic.[14] By the end of the 1970s the Afro had fallen out of favour among African-Americans, and was being replaced by other natural hairstyles such as corn rows and dreadlocks.[34]


excelent
you can't go wrong with a ghd. Ready to use in seconds and it straightens perfectly
T3’s white and rose gold flat iron seems too pretty to reliably function, but hey, sometimes miracles happen. There are four temperature settings ranging from 260 to 410 degrees, and the tool heats up in about a minute. Its ceramic plates are infused with tourmaline, a mineral said to make hair extra smooth because it emits negatively-charged ions. There’s no scientific evidence to support this, but my unscientific bathroom study found that this flat iron does indeed make my hair look shinier.
If you have really short hair, you’re better off with a narrow plate, around half an inch in size. If you want to curl your hair, smaller plates are also ideal. For those with longer, thicker tresses, you need wider plates, around 1 1/2 inches, to ensure that you cover more area on each pass. This decreases the amount of passes you need to make, preventing more damage done to your hair.
Great price for ghd

Great product and fastest shipment ever
Perfection is the word to describe the ghd classic styler...it's easy to use and the hair style last longer than by using other regular stylers sold on the market...once you try it you will see the difference right away.
my hair legit gets all the time very frizzy and never gets straight. This product is amazing and I truly think it is the real ghd it heats up quick and my hair straight lasts a very long time. Great for the price... Totally worth getting.
Hanz de Fuko’s Modify Pomade is 100% water based. A water based product is easy to wash out but still keeps your hair in place and shining to the max! We recommend using this product for medium hold and high shine. If you want to go full on extreme hold and high shine, then use Heavymade. Like our Modify Pomade, this water base formula goes on clean and heavy. Also great for edge control on African-American hair.

this flat iron is the best one I've ever had. It heats up very quickly. It actually makes my hair shiny. It is worth every dollar I spent on it
Historically, working-class people's haircuts have tended to be practical and simple. Working-class men have often shaved their heads or worn their hair close-cropped, and working-class women have typically pulled their hair up and off their faces in simple styles. However, today, working-class people often have more elaborate and fashion-conscious hairstyles than other social classes. Many working-class Mexican men in American cities wear their hair in styles like the Mongolian (shaved except for a tuft of hair at the nape of the neck) or the rat tail (crewcut on top, tuft at the nape), and African-Americans often wear their hair in complex patterns of box braids and cornrows, fastened with barrettes and beads, and sometimes including shaved sections or bright colour. Sociologists say these styles are an attempt to express individuality and presence in the face of social denigration and invisibility.[47]
I got these after using my sister in law's ghds and realising that my 11 year old babyliss ones were sadly inferior. I love that they heat up really quickly as when you have 3 small boys to get to school pre school every second counts. The results last overnight too with maybe a quick spruce up the following morning. All in all worth every penny
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