Styling products aside from shampoo and conditioner are many and varied. Leave-in conditioner, conditioning treatments, mousse, gels, lotions, waxes, creams, clays, serums, oils, and sprays are used to change the texture or shape of the hair, or to hold it in place in a certain style. Applied properly, most styling products will not damage the hair apart from drying it out; most styling products contain alcohols, which can dissolve oils. Many hair products contain chemicals which can cause build-up, resulting in dull hair or a change in perceived texture.
Hair straighteners come in a lot of different sizes, and that can make it more difficult to decide which one is right for you. By learning about the type of hair you have, the kind of style you want, and the amount of heat you need, you can also figure out what the best size iron for your hair is. It does make a difference for the sake of speed as well as precision. It sounds like a lot of work, but you can figure out what’s right for you by clicking here.
I bought this not to straighten my hair but to add long lasting curls. Once you get the hang of it this works great. My curls stay in longer than when I use a curling iron or hot rollers.
BUYER BEWARE: I bought this from Amazon LLC, but the product would NOT register as authentic on ghd's site. I tried the hologram code and date code multiple times, but the site wouldn't verify the numbers. Also there was no country of manufacture listed on the unit, the box or the booklet. The styler looked great and was packaged well. Did the unit and stickers look authentic? Yes in every way. But the ghd site states: "fake ghd products are virtually impossible to spot." I called ghd, and a rep said sometimes legit numbers aren't accepted by the site (?!) - and told me that sometimes fake numbers go through. So in the end not sure what good the checker does. The rep did add that "Amazon is not an authorized dealer for ghd products." And the rep echoed what another reviewer said, "the only way to authenticate a styler not bought from us or an authorized dealer is to send it in to the warehouse." That's too much trouble for anyone. Is the one I bought legit? I just can't tell for sure. I'm not taking the risk. Returning it to Amazon.

I am a loyal ghd purchaser but unfortunately my last set died after approximately five years daily use these are a perfect replacement. I have shoulder length hair and these are a great size for both curling and straightening.i also bought them when they were on offer so saved 10 and with prime delivery I didn't have to survive without my essential ghds.


I have very curly hair and used my friends styler and fell in love I bought this on amazon after reading the bad reviews. Beautifully packed in a very nicebox very easy to register b. So it’s not fake
This lightweight styler heats up quickly and has 20 temperature settings for all hair types which reach a top temperature of 230 degrees; making it ideal for people who have thicker or curlier hair. The inclusion of a long swivel cord makes it easy to move the styler around your head so you can fully straighten the hair at the back. Because of the shape of the plates, you can use them to smooth the hair down for perfectly sleek hair, or use their curved edges for gorgeous curls.
buy it you'll like it.

Just as described love it
We do love the fact that the flat iron remembers your last heat setting so you don’t have to keep changing it every time you turn the hair straightener on. With this flat iron, you also get an automatic shut off feature. The plates are 1.5 inches wide which makes it ideal for individuals with medium to long thick tresses. However, it isn’t ideal for making curls due to the large plates. Also, there may be durability issues as several owners have reported that their units never lasted more than a year.
With this hair straightener, you also get adjustable heat settings that range from 140 to 450 degrees Fahrenheit which means that it’s perfect for use whether you have thin, delicate hair or stubborn, coarse locks. We love that it has a 360-degree swivel cord, it heats up quickly, and the fact that it’s dual voltage compatible. You even get a thermal protective glove plus some leave-in argan oil with your purchase.

From the time of the Roman Empire[citation needed] until the Middle Ages, most women grew their hair as long as it would naturally grow. It was normally little styled by cutting, as women's hair was tied up on the head and covered on most occasions when outside the home with a snood, kerchief or veil; for an adult woman to wear uncovered and loose hair in the street was often restricted to prostitutes. Braiding and tying the hair was common. In the 16th century, women began to wear their hair in extremely ornate styles, often decorated with pearls, precious stones, ribbons and veils. Women used a technique called "lacing" or "taping," in which cords or ribbons were used to bind the hair around their heads.[14] During this period, most of the hair was braided and hidden under wimples, veils or couvrechefs. In the later half of the 15th century and on into the 16th century a very high hairline on the forehead was considered attractive, and wealthy women frequently plucked out hair at their temples and the napes of their necks, or used depilatory cream to remove it, if it would otherwise be visible at the edges of their hair coverings.[15] Working-class women in this period wore their hair in simple styles.[14]
From the 16th to the 19th century, European women's hair became more visible while their hair coverings grew smaller, with both becoming more elaborate, and with hairstyles beginning to include ornamentation such as flowers, ostrich plumes, ropes of pearls, jewels, ribbons and small crafted objects such as replicas of ships and windmills.[14][21] Bound hair was felt to be symbolic of propriety: loosening one's hair was considered immodest and sexual, and sometimes was felt to have supernatural connotations.[22] Red hair was popular, particularly in England during the reign of the red-haired Elizabeth I, and women and aristocratic men used borax, saltpeter, saffron and sulfur powder to dye their hair red, making themselves nauseated and giving themselves headaches and nosebleeds.[12][23] During this period in Spain and Latin cultures, women wore lace mantillas, often worn over a high comb,[14][24] and in Buenos Aires, there developed a fashion for extremely large tortoise-shell hair combs called peinetón, which could measure up to three feet in height and width, and which are said by historians to have reflected the growing influence of France, rather than Spain, upon Argentinians.[25]

Great purchase
Exactly what I was looking for for a gift.my daughter in law loves it.
wife luvs em ghds are the best in her opinion.
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