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After the war, women started to wear their hair in softer, more natural styles. In the early 1950s women's hair was generally curled and worn in a variety of styles and lengths. In the later 1950s, high bouffant and beehive styles, sometimes nicknamed B-52s for their similarity to the bulbous noses of the B-52 Stratofortress bomber, became popular.[31] During this period many women washed and set their hair only once a week, and kept it in place by wearing curlers every night and reteasing and respraying it every morning.[32] In the 1960s, many women began to wear their hair in short modern cuts such as the pixie cut, while in the 1970s, hair tended to be longer and looser. In both the 1960s and 1970s many men and women wore their hair very long and straight.[2] Women straightened their hair through chemical straightening processes, by ironing their hair at home with a clothes iron, or by rolling it up with large empty cans while wet.[33] African-American men and women began wearing their hair naturally (unprocessed) in large Afros, sometimes ornamented with Afro picks made from wood or plastic.[14] By the end of the 1970s the Afro had fallen out of favour among African-Americans, and was being replaced by other natural hairstyles such as corn rows and dreadlocks.[34]
Heats up in seconds awesome flat iron better than the chi and has lasted for several years now. You will not be disappointed
my styler seems to be legitimate and has the shiny sticker and seems to be correct in all other ways. It does indeed work so that really is all that matters. I was given this free for an honest review. I have to say overall I like this styler. It is the perfect size for my hair as it is short and medium in thickness. The styler it self is a little heavy to hold up for long periods so just be warned about that and it rolls on my counter top. It heats up quick and works great though and I love that I can curl or straighten and it has an auto shut off in case I forget to turn it off that is the best feature to any styler in my opinion so I do not burn my house down . Also this one in particular looks very nice not that it matters for functionality but it is a pretty iron. I was able to straighten my hair in far less time than my previous straightener and it seems also I am not using nearly as much heat. So I love this styler and my only complaint is that it is a bit clunky to hold.
In short YES! You absolutely can use too much heat on your hair. Burning hair is not a good smell, it’s not a good look either! You may end up having to get a pretty severe haircut if you’re not careful about the amount of heat you put directly on your locks. Read through this to get an idea of what’s safe and what will leave you wishing for a good trim (or possibly a wig).

The plates in this techy tool house an internal microchip that constantly measures and maintains an even temperature. With no random hot or cold spots, you'll get smoother, straighter, strands in fewer passes. (Spoiler alert: Fewer passes equal less damage). Adjustable temperature settings — from 260 to 410 degrees — make this ideal for any and every hair texture.
This is a really lovely gift set the packaging is so nice and the presentation makes it feel really special. The brush and hair clips are both very nicely made I don't really understand the design of the clips exactly as they are very flexible but they certainly hold my hair well during styling the brush is as a brush is... Brushy I have very fine hair and it tends towards the static this made the issue slightly worse. I plan on sticking with my regular wooden brush. The carrying bag and heat proof mat are both well made not quite my style as the quilted look isn't my favourite but both are quite posh and it's just really handy to have somewhere to always put the straighteners wherever I am. I particularly like the silicon cap to put over the end of the straighteners though it's very minimalistic and I think I'll use this item the most.as for the straighteners they are just as good as ghd are renowned for. They heat up really quickly and they beep to let you know when you switch on the power and when they are ready. I appreciate the auto off feature too that switches off after 30 minutes just in case. The plates are smooth and don't catch my hair too much there is a slight issue with that and one of the seams it doesn't always happen but sometimes I do catch a hair. Overall I'm really pleased and looking forward to lots more good hair days.
I got these after using my sister in law's ghds and realising that my 11 year old babyliss ones were sadly inferior. I love that they heat up really quickly as when you have 3 small boys to get to school pre school every second counts. The results last overnight too with maybe a quick spruce up the following morning. All in all worth every penny
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