First, there are the temperature settings. Obviously, different hair requires a different heat level. The thicker your hair is, the higher level of heat you should apply to straighten it. I highly recommend you to read the instructions which usually say what temperature you should select for your particular hair type. This may vary a little bit from one flat iron to another. The general rule here is the less heat you apply, the better your hair condition will be. And always use a heat protectant, regardless of your hair type.
no matter what hair straightener I purchase I always go back to my ghd hair straightener.always does an amazing job
Bought these at a very reasonable price and they are great.they arrived within the week of ordering them which was also great.
I absolutely love this thing best purchase ever I have dark annoying thick hair I'm asian and so a lion's mane look after hair drying isn't the best after using this ghd I would never turn back to a normal straightener I bought this in feb 2011 and after a year or so bad luck for me the ghd stopped working but without any hassle I sent it back to the manufacturers and they send me out a new one hassle free the 2nd one has had no problems think it may have been a product issue.i highly recommend this
In a word wow. I didn't think it would but this ghd straightener blew away. I turn it on and in about 5 minuets am ready to start making passes. There is only one heat setting hot and it's perfect. The weight is amazingly light it's thin easy to hold and doesn't fatigue my wrist.i've been using a different pro straightener and was certain nothing could compare. The one I had been using had options lots and lots of options. The ghd offers only one option and that is amazing.the auto shut off is also a very very appreciated feature yes this is not cheap. But the investment is well worth the cost.
the ghd iron is far superior to any other flat iron out there. I will never buy anything else. They last forever

Perukes or periwigs for men were introduced into the English-speaking world with other French styles when Charles II was restored to the throne in 1660, following a lengthy exile in France. These wigs were shoulder-length or longer, imitating the long hair that had become fashionable among men since the 1620s. Their use soon became popular in the English court. The London diarist Samuel Pepys recorded the day in 1665 that a barber had shaved his head and that he tried on his new periwig for the first time, but in a year of plague he was uneasy about wearing it:
gentle on hair doesn't fry it. Will never buy an off brand again
Aside from ionic and infrared technologies the Bio Ionic Onepass Straightening Iron has something that is entirely new to me: silicon covered plates. They get the hair more in order when you’re straightening, save you a lot of time and reduce the amount of heat that you need. This one is great for African American hair, but I already selected the xtava Pro Satin for that because it’s more affordable.
After the war, women started to wear their hair in softer, more natural styles. In the early 1950s women's hair was generally curled and worn in a variety of styles and lengths. In the later 1950s, high bouffant and beehive styles, sometimes nicknamed B-52s for their similarity to the bulbous noses of the B-52 Stratofortress bomber, became popular.[31] During this period many women washed and set their hair only once a week, and kept it in place by wearing curlers every night and reteasing and respraying it every morning.[32] In the 1960s, many women began to wear their hair in short modern cuts such as the pixie cut, while in the 1970s, hair tended to be longer and looser. In both the 1960s and 1970s many men and women wore their hair very long and straight.[2] Women straightened their hair through chemical straightening processes, by ironing their hair at home with a clothes iron, or by rolling it up with large empty cans while wet.[33] African-American men and women began wearing their hair naturally (unprocessed) in large Afros, sometimes ornamented with Afro picks made from wood or plastic.[14] By the end of the 1970s the Afro had fallen out of favour among African-Americans, and was being replaced by other natural hairstyles such as corn rows and dreadlocks.[34]

I read lots of different reviews about these straighteners and a lot said these aren't genuine. They are definitely ghds just professional ones which means they are lighter. They are exactly the same ones at my hair dressers. I'm happy.
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