best hair straightener ive have three of these straighteners and always love them. The only problem is that the cord shorts so be careful when you wrap it up. I would not recommend winding the cord around the straightener to put it away.
I have very curly hair my father african american and my mother is hispanic...i have had many hair straighteners in my time this one is by far the best one. I always used to but 2in ones but with a 1in you can get a lot closer to the scalp. My amazing hair stylist recommended this to me and im glad she did. Mine is till working perfectly fine. She has had hers for years so they must last a long time. The timer is great it shuts itself off if it is not being used for a certain amount of time. It also heats up to the max in 20 30 seconds so you dont have to let it heat up for a long time. Its great get it.
The ceramic plate on the FemJolie heats in just a minute or two, and the silicone tips on the bristles are quite comfortable on the scalp and gentle as they detangle, straighten and de-frizz. It’s important to note that this straightening brush is only designed to work on clean, dry hair; you won’t see the results you expect if you use it right after jumping out of the shower, and because it’s a flat brush it won’t add volume to your hair the way a barrel model would.
The ultimate clay products at Hanz de Fuko are Quicksand and Claymation (over 3 million sold!). Quicksand is both a styling clay and dry shampoo with high hold and a dry matte finish. For the ambitious learners, Quicksand contains diatomaceous earth, a sedimentary rock that’s highly absorbent and helps plump strands. Claymation on the other hand, is a styling “clay-wax” hybrid with super high hold and a matte finish. We added a touch of Quicksand to this formula for an added boost of holding power and flexible hold.
From the time of the Roman Empire[citation needed] until the Middle Ages, most women grew their hair as long as it would naturally grow. It was normally little styled by cutting, as women's hair was tied up on the head and covered on most occasions when outside the home with a snood, kerchief or veil; for an adult woman to wear uncovered and loose hair in the street was often restricted to prostitutes. Braiding and tying the hair was common. In the 16th century, women began to wear their hair in extremely ornate styles, often decorated with pearls, precious stones, ribbons and veils. Women used a technique called "lacing" or "taping," in which cords or ribbons were used to bind the hair around their heads.[14] During this period, most of the hair was braided and hidden under wimples, veils or couvrechefs. In the later half of the 15th century and on into the 16th century a very high hairline on the forehead was considered attractive, and wealthy women frequently plucked out hair at their temples and the napes of their necks, or used depilatory cream to remove it, if it would otherwise be visible at the edges of their hair coverings.[15] Working-class women in this period wore their hair in simple styles.[14]
Easy to use. Quickly heats up and gives a soft beep when it's ready. Much prefer it over the chi straighteners I've used in the past
These are fab ghd’s makes hair lovely silky great purchase
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