Most straighteners will have either ceramic or tourmaline plates, although a few use titanium. Ceramic is the best choice for delicate, fine or color-treated hair because it heats evenly and a bit more slowly than tourmaline or titanium with no hot spots. Tourmaline and titanium, by contrast, heat up extremely quickly and can easily damage thin or sensitive hair before you’re even aware that it’s happened. For thick hair, though, tourmaline or titanium are the way to go; tourmaline has the added benefit of producing 20x more negative ions, making hair moist and silky and reducing frizz.
The historical dictum to brush hair with one hundred strokes every day is somewhat archaic, dating from a time when hair was washed less frequently; the brushstrokes would spread the scalp's natural oils down through the hair, creating a protective effect. Now, however, this does not apply when the natural oils have been washed off by frequent shampoos. Also, hairbrushes are now usually made with rigid plastic bristles instead of the natural boar's bristles that were once standard; the plastic bristles increase the likelihood of actually injuring the scalp and hair with excessively vigorous brushing. However, traditional brushes with boar's bristles are still commonly used among African Americans and those with coarse or kinky textures to soften and lay down curls and waves.

I read lots of different reviews about these straighteners and a lot said these aren't genuine. They are definitely ghds just professional ones which means they are lighter. They are exactly the same ones at my hair dressers. I'm happy.
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