After the war, women started to wear their hair in softer, more natural styles. In the early 1950s women's hair was generally curled and worn in a variety of styles and lengths. In the later 1950s, high bouffant and beehive styles, sometimes nicknamed B-52s for their similarity to the bulbous noses of the B-52 Stratofortress bomber, became popular.[31] During this period many women washed and set their hair only once a week, and kept it in place by wearing curlers every night and reteasing and respraying it every morning.[32] In the 1960s, many women began to wear their hair in short modern cuts such as the pixie cut, while in the 1970s, hair tended to be longer and looser. In both the 1960s and 1970s many men and women wore their hair very long and straight.[2] Women straightened their hair through chemical straightening processes, by ironing their hair at home with a clothes iron, or by rolling it up with large empty cans while wet.[33] African-American men and women began wearing their hair naturally (unprocessed) in large Afros, sometimes ornamented with Afro picks made from wood or plastic.[14] By the end of the 1970s the Afro had fallen out of favour among African-Americans, and was being replaced by other natural hairstyles such as corn rows and dreadlocks.[34]
My third pair of ghds quality product
Historically, working-class people's haircuts have tended to be practical and simple. Working-class men have often shaved their heads or worn their hair close-cropped, and working-class women have typically pulled their hair up and off their faces in simple styles. However, today, working-class people often have more elaborate and fashion-conscious hairstyles than other social classes. Many working-class Mexican men in American cities wear their hair in styles like the Mongolian (shaved except for a tuft of hair at the nape of the neck) or the rat tail (crewcut on top, tuft at the nape), and African-Americans often wear their hair in complex patterns of box braids and cornrows, fastened with barrettes and beads, and sometimes including shaved sections or bright colour. Sociologists say these styles are an attempt to express individuality and presence in the face of social denigration and invisibility.[47]

Other factors may also be important to you, including the weight of the unit, how comfortable the handle feels in your hand, whether there is an LCD display and an automatic shut-off feature, and the length of the power cord. But remember: heat levels come first, because they determine whether your hair comes out straight, shiny and silky – or a damaged, fried mess. Everything else is secondary.
great set of straighters for a reasonable price. I would definitely recommend ghds over other brands of straighters. Each set I've had have lasted around 2 years before an electrical fault caused them to stop working I'm onto my fourth pair now.
In short YES! You absolutely can use too much heat on your hair. Burning hair is not a good smell, it’s not a good look either! You may end up having to get a pretty severe haircut if you’re not careful about the amount of heat you put directly on your locks. Read through this to get an idea of what’s safe and what will leave you wishing for a good trim (or possibly a wig).
beautiful looking and feel very good quality. They are designed to be very comfortable to hold and I love that they switch on and heat up in seconds. They come with a mat to protect surfaces from burns and a good travel case. The cable is a decent length. Best of all they do a brilliant job on my hair and don’t seem to dry it up despite daily use. Unlike my old straighteners I have managed to avoid burnin myself too.
True ghd product gets hot as soon as you turn it on. My fianc absolutely loves it. I will definitely continue to use amazon in the future.

I love this straighter its the mercedes of all straighteners. It gets hot really quickly and doesn't burn my hair. The seller is great. The shipping was quick and painless I'm very pleased


love it heats up quick and does a great job.

If you have ever visited a luxury spa or wellness company, you have probably run across far infrared heat a time or two. Without going into too much science, infrared heat is the same heat you feel when the sun kisses your cheeks and warms your body from the inside-out. Far infrared heat, in particular, has been used by medical and wellness professionals for years to treat a variety of conditions from muscle pain to even cancer.


Customers rave about it being great for fine hair, short hair and also very straight hair – it manages to generate good looking curls no matter what hair texture. However, it is not recommended for very long hair as the brush isn’t large enough to cope with a long, large amount.  Nevertheless, it’s a good all round styler that won’t break the bank  and features two attachments, 19mm and 23mm as well as a vent brush– an all-round superb budget styler.
my first ghd styler. I was super skeptical about the purchase considering the 50 difference on their website. I was able to register it so I'm thrilled to say it's the real deal though I haven't tried it in my hair yet I know what to expect...
I would recommend this product to any lady that regularly straightens her hair. Product gets hot quick and turns off after about 30 minutes of no use. Simply the best straightener I've ever had.
Just because you were blessed with a head of naturally straight hair, doesn’t mean hair straighteners aren’t for you! Hair straighteners are a great way to style the split ends that are all too common with straight hair types and can also give your hair a natural-looking curve for added volume! When shopping for the best hair straightener for your naturally straight hair, you will want to look for the following:
Users with super-thick hair have given Remington's 1" Pearl Straightener the stamp of approval on Target's website, praising it for quickly and easily smoothing strands. According to reviewers, the $24.99 tool stands up to counterparts that are more than six times the price, so you'd be hard-pressed to find a better deal out there. It has multiple heat settings, allowing you to adjust the quick-heat plates to just the right temperature to create pin-straight hair or soft curls.

In 2001, ghd revolutionised the way women styled their hair with the launch of its first styler – a professional tool designed for salon use that could also be easily used at home. ghd has continued to be a leader and innovator in hair styling with its range of professional brushes, ghd Style styling products and the launch of its first hairdryer, ghd air™. Show less
Before placing your entire head under unnecessary heat conditions, try straightening a small section of your hair with what you believe is your ideal heat setting. Take notice of the way your hair reacts to this temperature, paying close attention to any fraying or singeing that may result. Smoking and that dreaded burnt hair smell are a sign that you may need to tone it down a bit to avoid permanent damage to your precious locks.
wife luvs em ghds are the best in her opinion.
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