although I am pretty ancient I had never used straighteners until last year when I thought I'd try them out. I bought some cheap ones which did the job but the sides used to catch on my hair and break it. I don't have enough hair as it is so definitely can't afford to tear any of it so thought I'd try these ghd ones after a friend recommended them. They cost about 5 times what the others did but they are at least 5 times better. They heat up quickly and never catch my hair. Fab. I love them.
I have had this straightener for months now and I love it. I have really thick hair and it gets the job done quickly.pros heats up incredibly fast beeps to tell you when it's ready doesn't fry your haircons no ability to adjust temperature non movable irons as opposed to amika which I had before I would definitely recommend this for anyone who's looking for a simple but high quality straightener.
“Amazing! I have used a high-end salon-quality CHI flat iron for years, thinking it top of the line. I tried Conair Infiniti with rather low expectations but needed a backup at a reasonable price. Boy, am I glad I got off my high horse and took the plunge! This is the best flat iron I’ve ever owned. I have dry hair, and this leaves it looking shiny, soft, smooth, and moisturized. My CHI still straightens wonderfully, but my hair still looked a bit straw-like (even while using flat iron protectant every time). I am totally sold and thrilled with my Infiniti, and the price is AMAZING for something that FAR outperforms its salon-priced counterparts. It’s well-made, sturdy, pretty to look at, heats up quickly with functional, easy-to-read controls, and has a comfortable weight and handling. I love mine and no longer even bother with the CHI anymore. My hair is soft, shiny, healthier and SO much less ‘fried’ than before, even with daily use.”

since my 10 year old ghds finally packed in a year ago I've been using a well known but inferior brand which were much cheaper and have really noticed the difference my hair took longer to style and was drier and frizzier than when I was using the ghds. Therefore these straighteners were a real treat to use.they heat up in a few seconds and give a 'beep' warning signal when they're ready to use. The paddles are narrow but plenty wide enough for my short thick hair. My hair glided through smoothly without tangling or pulling leaving my hair smooth shiny and straight.these straighteners come with a very long 2.7m cable. Unfortunately it has one of those rounded plugs which are really difficult to pull out of the socket. This didn't bother me too much as I leave mine plugged in and switch the socket on and off as required. On that note for safety reasons the straighteners start beeping after a few minutes of not being used and switch off completely after 30 minutes.for me ghds will always be worth the money. These come with a 3 year warranty and my previous pair lasted 10 years so I think they're a great investment.
It has ceramic plates, which work on all hair types to effectively smooth and add waves and curls, depending on your desired finish. The result is incredibly shiny and frizz-free locks, which look styled to perfection. The straighteners also have a unique hibernation mode, which means they will turn off automatically after 30 minutes, so you can be sure they can’t cause damage.

The heat can reach up to 400 degrees Fahrenheit; not as high as our other picks but definitely high enough for most hair types. However, for those with stubborn, coarse hair, you may want to look elsewhere for your hair styling needs. Also, this is one of the priciest hair straighteners we’ve tried so you’ll need to save a bit to splurge on this one.
Just bought a new ghd straightener. I have an old one 12 years old and ghd is not available in my country so I decided to buy a new one if the older one would die . I have used the old one everyday sometimes 2x a day for 12 years and I absolutely love it. I have been trying the new one and it is a litle bit different seems to weigh a litle bit less and has a sound effect when it is turned on. I feel like the new one is to smooth but that could be because the old one is very old and has a different feel and the plates are more used. But both of them give me very straight hair. I was very skeptical when reading the reviews on amazon....is it fake or not. My conclusion is that this is not fake and the best hair straightener ever. I have long curly frizzy hair and it takes me under 5 minutes to straighten my hair. I have tried many brands over the years and I have to say that ghd is the best of the best.
this straightener is amazing. It heats up in about 20 seconds and is slim and does it's job perfectly. I tell all of my friends about it
My friend recommend this flat iron and I am so glad she did it works wonderfully. Heats up very quickly and beeps when its ready for use. Does a great job of straightening my long hair and it lasts until my next wash. Worth the money
it heats instantly and easy to handle. I love it
I have purchased may flat irons in the past and the ghd is far superior than all others. Heats fast and turns offwithin 30 mins. If not in use. This is soo worth the money. Thanks amazon
this was a birthday present for my daughter and she received it by her birthday and was extremely happy with it. Works great with her corse hair.

The male wig was pioneered by King Louis XIII of France (1601–1643) in 1624. Perukes or periwigs for men were introduced into the English-speaking world with other French styles in 1660. Late 17th-century wigs were very long and wavy, but became shorter in the mid-18th century, by which time they were normally white. Short hair for fashionable men was a product of the Neoclassical movement. In the early 19th century the male beard, and also moustaches and sideburns, made a strong reappearance. From the 16th to the 19th century, European women's hair became more visible while their hair coverings grew smaller. In the middle of the 18th century the pouf style developed. During the First World War, women around the world started to shift to shorter hairstyles that were easier to manage. In the early 1950s women's hair was generally curled and worn in a variety of styles and lengths. In the 1960s, many women began to wear their hair in short modern cuts such as the pixie cut, while in the 1970s, hair tended to be longer and looser. In both the 1960s and 1970s many men and women wore their hair very long and straight.[2] In the 1980s, women pulled back their hair with scrunchies. During the 1980s, punk hairstyles were adopted by many people.

It may surprise you what less than $50 can get you when shopping for flat irons at stores like Target, Ulta, Amazon and more, but trust the hundreds of reviews calling these bargain buys the real deal. Especially if you consider using hot tools only when you need an extra level of polish, or to quickly smooth out hair when you're in a pinch, the industry's cheaper picks are more than suitable to your needs — don't bother shelling out a significant portion of your paycheck for a high-priced hot tool that'll go unused more often than not.
Short hair for fashionable men was a product of the Neoclassical movement. Classically inspired male hair styles included the Bedford Crop, arguably the precursor of most plain modern male styles, which was invented by the radical politician Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford as a protest against a tax on hair powder; he encouraged his frends to adopt it by betting them they would not. Another influential style (or group of styles) was named by the French "à la Titus" after Titus Junius Brutus (not in fact the Roman Emperor Titus as often assumed), with hair short and layered but somewhat piled up on the crown, often with restrained quiffs or locks hanging down; variants are familiar from the hair of both Napoleon and George IV of England. The style was supposed to have been introduced by the actor François-Joseph Talma, who upstaged his wigged co-actors when appearing in productions of works such as Voltaire's Brutus (about Lucius Junius Brutus, who orders the execution of his son Titus). In 1799, a Parisian fashion magazine reported that even bald men were adopting Titus wigs,[18] and the style was also worn by women, the Journal de Paris reporting in 1802 that "more than half of elegant women were wearing their hair or wig à la Titus."[19]
Just what you expect from ghd the wife loves them and they do a fantastic job
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